1st October 2014

Photoset reblogged from c a d n e y (◍•ᴗ•◍) ♪ with 790 notes

milkamenthe:

More about these babies here~

Tights by Cordelia

on tumblr

on facebook

on instagram

Source: milkamenthe.blogspot.com.au

1st October 2014

Photo reblogged from This Too Shall Pass with 37,027 notes

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source
Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.
The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.
Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.
It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source

Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.

The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.

Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.

It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

Source: knowledgeandlove

1st October 2014

Photoset reblogged from This Too Shall Pass with 296,328 notes

houseofh0rr0rs:

marauders4evr:

Halloween just wouldn’t be the same without Tim Burton

(From top to bottom: Beetlejuice, The Nightmare Before Christmas, The Corpse Bride, Alice in Wonderland, Sleepy Hollow, Edward Scissorhands, Sweeny Todd, Dark Shadows, Frankenweenie)

Tim Burton ❤️

Source: marauders4evr

1st October 2014

Photo reblogged from with 10,503 notes

gravesandghouls:

"Riding High" by Gil Elvgren, 1958

gravesandghouls:

"Riding High" by Gil Elvgren, 1958

Source: gravesandghouls

1st October 2014

Photo reblogged from Monsters & Werewolves with 14 notes

monsters-werewolves:

AwaraOOoo! It’s #WerewolfWednesday and DA user aichan25 thought it might be nice to share some werewolfy stuff including this werewolf suit she created! Excellent work and certainly a werewolf!
By the way, there are a whole slew of photos of this suit as well as other artwork at her DA page, so check it out!

 fun fact: this was at fort pickens pensacola FL,….in a very spooky tunnel i don’t go into anymore since ,..i believe a ghost broke my camera….it’s freaking spooky, thats why the photo is at the opening

monsters-werewolves:

AwaraOOoo! It’s #WerewolfWednesday and DA user aichan25 thought it might be nice to share some werewolfy stuff including this werewolf suit she created! Excellent work and certainly a werewolf!

By the way, there are a whole slew of photos of this suit as well as other artwork at her DA page, so check it out!

 fun fact: this was at fort pickens pensacola FL,….in a very spooky tunnel i don’t go into anymore since ,..i believe a ghost broke my camera….it’s freaking spooky, thats why the photo is at the opening

1st October 2014

Photo reblogged from This Too Shall Pass with 4,251 notes

chebits:

happy halloween motherfuckers

chebits:

happy halloween motherfuckers

Source: bewarethehorrorblog

1st October 2014

Question reblogged from Sketchpot with 75 notes

Anonymous said: I have a cute art style and reasonable prices. Why won't people commission meeee... What's te secret??

thefusspot:

undauntra:

joyeuse-noelle:

thefusspot:

Honestly?  I dunno if there’s really too much of a secret to it.  I’m surprised as hell to get responses whenever I do manage to put up an announcement.

I guess the first thing I’d recommend is to make sure you’re posting consistently.  Doesn’t matter too much what it is, as long as you’re staying visible and relevant.  My style hops all over the damned place, and I might not like what I make most times, but I still put it up.  Second thing is, try to make sure your prices aren’t too reasonable, if you get my drift.  I see a few folks from time to time posting commissions that might literally earn them a buck an hour, depending on how long it takes them to finish, and there’s definitely some merit to the old adage, “People value those who value themselves”.  I thought my stuff was too expensive at first, but I stuck with it and I’m not doing too terrible for myself when I do open up.

Sorry that I can’t really provide a magical answer.  I’m still kind of in that limbo where I wonder consistently “Will they bite?  Won’t they?”  It’s nerve-wracking, for sure, and it’s often pretty hard to tell just what it is you’re supposed to do.  But keep at it.

(I’ll toss in another little suggestion that might get me some backlash, but whatever:  If you’re hurting for eyeballs?  Fanart.  A little fanart goes a long way, especially if it’s relevant, and it’s something you’re super into.  Don’t do it purely for the sake of getting an audience, do it because it’s something you like.  Your chances are higher of doing it well, and it can act as a draw for folks who might not have seen your work otherwise.)

This is hypothetical - I haven’t done any tests or anything - but I suspect that fan art is the best thing you can do to get commissions.

On his podcast, Adam Savage mentioned something an old boss had told him about portfolios. I can’t place it exactly (the episode was probably something like a year and a half ago), but the gist was this:

"If you come to me, as a potential employee, with a portfolio full of original work, it’s not very useful to me, because I don’t know how close it came to what you intended it to be. If you come to me with a ‘57 Chevy that you built by yourself from scratch, that’s useful, because I know what a ‘57 Chevy is supposed to look like and I can tell how close you got to the original car."

I have a feeling that the same thing is going to apply to fan art. If you’ve got a portfolio full of original art and your own characters, a potential commissioner isn’t going to have any idea how close they come to the vision of the character you have in your head. But your potential commissioners know what Buffy looks like, or Aang, or Dean and Sam, or Amy Pond. They can compare your fan art to the conception in their head, and they can say, “yes, this person is able to render someone else’s character well”, which is really the key insight a potential commissioner needs.

Also consider publicity and professionalism. Publicity is simple: if people don’t know that you exist, they can’t commission your art. You aren’t doing yourself any favors by asking this anonymously, for instance. Now I know that there’s some anon out there with a cute art style and reasonable prices, but even if that’s exactly up my alley, I still don’t know how to reach you. 

Professionalism is another competitive advantage, and a lot of amateur artists don’t really think about it. As a buyer, I want to know exactly what I’m getting for my money, and I want confidence that the artist will deliver what they say they will. I want to see past commissions and reviews from your previous customers. Ideally, I want a referral from someone I know and trust. I also look for a well-defined price list with examples, an estimated production time, and licensing and payment terms.

Let me expand on that. When I commission art, I want to know if I’m buying work for hire, or some sort of license. I don’t necessarily expect amateur artists to fully advertise everything on their commission page, but if a customer asks, you should have your answers ready.

For example, say that I want to commission a logo for my company. I want to own the intellectual property so that I can replicate it freely, sell it on my merchandise, license it to others if I want, etc. All the rights would belong to me, not the artist. This would be considered work-for-hire. You don’t have to do work for hire if you don’t want to! Many artists refuse to, and the ones who do charge lots more for it. But if I ask if you do work-for-hire, you should be able to give me a quick, simple answer - and if you do, tell me what your prices are. It’d be even better if your price list included the information up front.

Or maybe I just want art for my favorite original D&D character! I want to know which rights you are selling me to that art. One copy for personal use is the bare minimum, but can I do more with it? Can I put it up on my campaign website? Can I make copies to hand out at Gen Con if I reuse the character two years later as a pregen in the module that I’m running? Do I get the original art (if it’s a traditional medium) or just a digital copy? Do you retain the right to use the art as part of your portfolio? Do you retain the right to sell coffee mugs with that art on? It’s nice to know the answers to these questions, and to have appropriate boilerplate drawn up in case the buyer needs a contract.

You also want well-defined payment and approval processes. You don’t want to put a lot of time and effort into your art, only for me to refuse to pay you. I don’t want to pay you up front, only to get completely the wrong art. The usual compromise is to arrange for payment in installments. The minimal example would be: I pay a half up front, you do the art, then I pay the rest. It doesn’t have to be half and half, though and you can add more steps at different points in the production process. Maybe I pay 1/3, you send me the line art for approval, I pay another 1/3, you send me the final art, I pay the last 1/3. There are a lot of ways to do this, but the important part is that you have put some thought into this and know how you want to do it, and how much you are willing to compromise with what the buyer wants. (There is one artist who asks for cash up front whom I am seriously considering offering her usual rate up front, plus a bonus on completion simply because that incentivizes her to complete the art in a timely manner.)

And of course appearances are a part of professionalism too. Your website/commission page should have high-quality sample of your art style, and your spelling and grammar should be perfect! Sure, some buyers won’t care if you can spell… but why limit your potential market that way? Even if it’s not your strong point, have someone else look it over. The same applies to your professional communications. Keep a mature, reasonable tone, and use a spell-checker.

(Also, note that I am probably not representative of your average buyer. I want licensing rights to be made very, very clear up front, and I am willing to pay a premium to get the specific rights that I want. This is not the case for all buyers.)

Some advice from both sides of the fence, both artist and buyer.

1st October 2014

Photo reblogged from Monsters & Werewolves with 10 notes

monsters-werewolves:

Another shot of DA’s aichan25 in one of her werewolf suits! #WerewolfWednesday
I liked this photo because I’d love to just hang out in an elevator as my own werewolf character, scaring the crap out of folks on halloween night. 
Admittedly, I’d have to choose an appropriate elevator. For example: Seniors’ home = BAD CHOICE.

hahahaha people were scared of me yes, noone wanted to get on

monsters-werewolves:

Another shot of DA’s aichan25 in one of her werewolf suits! #WerewolfWednesday

I liked this photo because I’d love to just hang out in an elevator as my own werewolf character, scaring the crap out of folks on halloween night. 

Admittedly, I’d have to choose an appropriate elevator. For example: Seniors’ home = BAD CHOICE.

hahahaha people were scared of me yes, noone wanted to get on

1st October 2014

Photoset reblogged from This Too Shall Pass with 8,856 notes

goddamn-batgirl:

New glow in the dark pendants (and purple pulsing LED pendants) up at Dark of the Moon Arts! Please come take a look at our new pieces, and our other jewelry as well!

Source: goddamn-batgirl

1st October 2014

Photoset reblogged from CUTESY with 12,267 notes

zippiner:

steampunktendencies:

Octopus WIG by Kirstie Williams

[ via  Tentacles ]

mcjigglemeats

i WANT the purple one!

Source: steampunktendencies